As part of the Inclusive Leadership Program, Future Leaders Workshops focus on diversity-related themes and offer practical leadership skills. Workshops are open to all faculty and staff. Workshops will be recorded with closed captioning and posted at a later date.


Leading with Empathy

Thursday, Oct 1, 12:00-12:30, Zoom RSVP

Presenters: Elizabeth Nguyen, Lead Instructional Technologist, Digital Learning, & Christina Kalel, Instructional Applications Support Specialist, Office of Instruction and Assessment

This workshop will teach participants how to take a trauma-informed approach to leading in a pandemic and during other distressing times. This will include practical steps for how to manage communication while working at home. We'll also talk about giving team members time to share non-work content (as you might in communal work spaces, in person) and bond as a team. We'll share tips to help your team avoid burnout, and how to be flexible to accommodate life events. While the current environment is challenging to all of us, you'll leave with concrete ways to keep your team's workplace environment from being one more source of stress and trauma.


Abolition In and Out of the Classroom: Starting a Conversation

Monday, Oct 12, 12:00-12:45 (last 15 minutes are optional for questions), Zoom RSVP

Presenter: Emily R. Lyons, Lecturer, School of Information

In many spaces in higher education, we talk about empowering marginalized voices and tout commitment to diversity. However, attempts to support students from marginalized backgrounds are often undermined by institutional norms that reinforce class, race, and other forms of privilege. These norms not only hold back marginalized students academically; they actively punish them. This contributes to disproportional rates of attrition, greater student debt burden, and other barriers that stand in the way of later success. The abolitionist movement, which defined broadly works to dismantle all forms of institutional oppression, offers better models. In this workshop, I call attention to punitive mechanisms that are normalized in higher education, explaining how they are harmful and who is most harmed by them, and I outline what abolitionist alternatives might look like. I lead participants through an exercise to recognize common institutional mechanisms as punitive and invite reflection on the purpose of these mechanisms. The goals of this workshop are to encourage participants to incorporate abolitionist thinking into their leadership approach and to begin to map avenues to more productive partnerships with students. 


Building Empathy: Lessons from Design Thinking  

Tuesday, Oct 20, 12:00-12:45 (last 15 minutes are optional for questions), Zoom RSVP

Presenter: Kasi Kiehlbaugh, Director, Health Sciences Design, Office of the Senior Vice President for Health Sciences

Most design thinking workshops focus on brainstorming, especially when time is limited. In order to foster more inclusive working and learning environments, this workshop will instead introduce skills from the first step of the design thinking process: empathize. The group will learn to "see through new eyes" by working through two empathy-building exercises – Learning from Extremes and Immersing in Empathy – and explore how the skill of consciously building empathy could be used to increase belongingness and create a more inclusive campus culture. Empathy experiences help us see beyond our assumptions by putting us in the shoes of those we are serving: our students, our colleagues, and the community. Emotional, visceral triggers can be highly motivating. Sharing these emotional experiences helps bond and align teams around a common goal. Immersive empathy is one of the most powerful tools we have access to for changing behavior. Workshop attendees will be challenged to conduct the empathy experiences they design during the workshop, and they will have the opportunity to participate in an optional follow-up meeting to discuss their experiences and how they might leverage what they learned to enhance their own inclusive leadership skills and build a more inclusive culture at UA.  


Assessment as a Tool for Advancing Equity and Inclusion

Monday, November 2, 12:00-12:45 (last 15 minutes are optional for questions), Zoom RSVP

Presenters: Marla Franco, Assistant Vice Provost, Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) Initiatives, & Lucas Schalewski, Director, Assessment & Research

This session will reframe assessment, which is often seen as a neutral process, to intentionally be used as a strategy that supports equity and inclusion. Opportunities exist at every stage of the assessment cycle to enact inclusive assessment practices and focus on achieving more equitable outcomes. These may include the creation of clear objectives and measurable outcomes that account for the needs and interests of diverse populations, employing relevant methodologies with inclusive design, disaggregating findings to better understand the ways in which campus community members uniquely experience and benefit from college, and taking an equity-minded approach to analysis, communication, and use of the findings to inform changes to policy and practice.  Participants will leave with an understanding of equity-minded assessment concepts and methods and how they can be applied to the work they lead.


Inclusive Classrooms: Using the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Framework to Create More Engaging Assignments  

Friday, Nov 13, 12:00-12:45 (last 15 minutes are optional for questions), Zoom RSVP

Presenter: Kathleen J. Kennedy, Associate Professor of Practice, Retailing and Consumer Science, Norton School

Inclusive teaching and learning practices are instrumental in creating a learning environment where all participants are engaged, respected, and able to contribute. Assessments designed with a variety of learners in mind more accurately capture student progress and learning and lead to higher rates of student learning success. This workshop will demonstrate how the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework can be applied to assessment design and result in creating learning experiences that respect diversity, foster participation, remove barriers, and embrace a variety of learning needs and preferences. Methods for creating inclusive assignments will be presented: scaffolding, flexible assignments, transparent and student-centered evaluation criteria, and co-creation of learning. Examples -- two successes and one not-so-successful developmental experience -- will be shared and discussed. 


For questions about access or to request any disability-related accommodations, please contact Trinity Fuentes at tfuentes@email.arizona.edu. Learn more about the Inclusive Leadership Program here